Campus massacre review set up


Summary

Virginia Governor Timothy Kaine has set up an independent panel to review this week's university massacre.

Speaking at a news conference about Monday's shootings at Virginia Tech University that left 33 people dead, Mr Kaine said the review panel will look at "all the circumstances surrounding this horrible event so that we can examine everything that happened and hopefully learn from it."

The governor outlined some of the questions to be answered about the gunman, South Korean student Cho Seung-Hui, 23, who had a history of mental illness and shot himself in the head after his methodical rampage.

"What was his interaction with the mental health system? What kind of treatment did he receive or did he not receive? What were the warning signs? Who was warned? What was done? What did he do to acquire these weapons? How did he learn to use the weapons?"

Cho has been described as a sullen loner by students, teachers and his roommates and his violent writings and intimidating manner raised alarm bells among some of his professors long before the attacks.

Cho was committed to a mental institution in December 2005 after one of two stalking incidents involving female students but was released the next day for outpatient treatment after he was deemed not to be a danger to others.

Mr Kaine said the circumstances of the shootings on campus must be found out.
"And so minute by minute, to the best of our ability, we will work to determine all of the circumstances and events surrounding the shooting."

Mr Kaine said the law enforcement and medical emergency responses to the shootings also must be studied.

Former Virginia State Police superintendent Gerald Massengill will lead the eight-person panel, which will also include former US Homeland Security chief Tom Ridge, an ex-FBI agent and experts in higher education and mental health.

Monday's massacre, the deadliest school shootings in US history, has raised a barrage of questions about whether Cho — with his mental problems and stalking episodes — should have been allowed to remain in school.


Virginia Governor Timothy Kaine has set up an independent panel to review this week's university massacre.

Speaking at a news conference about Monday's shootings at Virginia Tech University that left 33 people dead, Mr Kaine said the review panel will look at "all the circumstances surrounding this horrible event so that we can examine everything that happened and hopefully learn from it."

The governor outlined some of the questions to be answered about the gunman, South Korean student Cho Seung-Hui, 23, who had a history of mental illness and shot himself in the head after his methodical rampage.

"What was his interaction with the mental health system? What kind of treatment did he receive or did he not receive? What were the warning signs? Who was warned? What was done? What did he do to acquire these weapons? How did he learn to use the weapons?"

Cho has been described as a sullen loner by students, teachers and his roommates and his violent writings and intimidating manner raised alarm bells among some of his professors long before the attacks.

Cho was committed to a mental institution in December 2005 after one of two stalking incidents involving female students but was released the next day for outpatient treatment after he was deemed not to be a danger to others.

Mr Kaine said the circumstances of the shootings on campus must be found out.
"And so minute by minute, to the best of our ability, we will work to determine all of the circumstances and events surrounding the shooting."

Mr Kaine said the law enforcement and medical emergency responses to the shootings also must be studied.

Former Virginia State Police superintendent Gerald Massengill will lead the eight-person panel, which will also include former US Homeland Security chief Tom Ridge, an ex-FBI agent and experts in higher education and mental health.

Monday's massacre, the deadliest school shootings in US history, has raised a barrage of questions about whether Cho — with his mental problems and stalking episodes — should have been allowed to remain in school.