Climate deal 'weak'


Summary

But observers hailed the pact for tying the United States to the goal of fighting global warming.

The G8 agreed at a summit in this German seaside resort to pursue major cuts to dangerous greenhouse gas pollution and said they would "seriously consider" the goal of halving global emissions by 2050.

The deal brokered by German Chancellor Angela Merkel was a compromise which she admitted fell short of her target of a binding agreement to slash carbon pollution, in the face of US opposition to any mandatory targets.

Ms Merkel said she was "very satisfied" and British Prime Minister Tony Blair called the deal "a major, major step forward."

Deal ‘a tiny landmark’

But global warming campaigners said it came up far too short.

"These goals are a joke," said anti-globalisation group Attac, which organised days of noisy protests against the summit.

"The deal is clearly not enough to prevent dangerous climate change" said Daniel Mittler, climate policy advisor of Greenpeace International.

"The US isolation in refusing to accept binding emission cuts has become blindingly obvious at this meeting."

Greenpeace said G8 states need to slash emissions by at least 80 percent by 2050 to avoid catastrophic global warming.

"Chancellor Merkel and Prime Minister Blair are trying to portray this as a strong agreement. But President Bush didn't give them an inch," said Philip Clapp, president of the US National Environmental Trust.

"The best they could get from him was a statement that their 50percent-by-2050 emissions reduction proposal would be 'seriously considered'.

“That's a pretty tiny landmark."

‘A new chapter of international cooperation’

But many observers said the declaration signed by Britain, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Russia as well as the United States opened a new chapter of international cooperation with Washington.

The UN's top official on climate change said the declaration was "everything I had hoped for" and suggested Washington had made significant concessions.

Yvo de Boer, executive secretary of the United Nations' Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) said very recently, the United States "indicated that it was premature to begin negotiations on a post-2012 climate change regime.

"So that's a very clear shift,"he said.

European media are overwhelmingly positive in their take on the pact.

German newspapers credited Ms Merkel's close ties with Mr Bush as making the difference, in positive editorials across the political spectrum.


But observers hailed the pact for tying the United States to the goal of fighting global warming.

The G8 agreed at a summit in this German seaside resort to pursue major cuts to dangerous greenhouse gas pollution and said they would "seriously consider" the goal of halving global emissions by 2050.

The deal brokered by German Chancellor Angela Merkel was a compromise which she admitted fell short of her target of a binding agreement to slash carbon pollution, in the face of US opposition to any mandatory targets.

Ms Merkel said she was "very satisfied" and British Prime Minister Tony Blair called the deal "a major, major step forward."

Deal ‘a tiny landmark’

But global warming campaigners said it came up far too short.

"These goals are a joke," said anti-globalisation group Attac, which organised days of noisy protests against the summit.

"The deal is clearly not enough to prevent dangerous climate change" said Daniel Mittler, climate policy advisor of Greenpeace International.

"The US isolation in refusing to accept binding emission cuts has become blindingly obvious at this meeting."

Greenpeace said G8 states need to slash emissions by at least 80 percent by 2050 to avoid catastrophic global warming.

"Chancellor Merkel and Prime Minister Blair are trying to portray this as a strong agreement. But President Bush didn't give them an inch," said Philip Clapp, president of the US National Environmental Trust.

"The best they could get from him was a statement that their 50percent-by-2050 emissions reduction proposal would be 'seriously considered'.

“That's a pretty tiny landmark."

‘A new chapter of international cooperation’

But many observers said the declaration signed by Britain, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Russia as well as the United States opened a new chapter of international cooperation with Washington.

The UN's top official on climate change said the declaration was "everything I had hoped for" and suggested Washington had made significant concessions.

Yvo de Boer, executive secretary of the United Nations' Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) said very recently, the United States "indicated that it was premature to begin negotiations on a post-2012 climate change regime.

"So that's a very clear shift,"he said.

European media are overwhelmingly positive in their take on the pact.

German newspapers credited Ms Merkel's close ties with Mr Bush as making the difference, in positive editorials across the political spectrum.