Gunman sent video to NBC


Summary

"Earlier today, NBC News in New York received correspondence that we believe to have been from Cho Seung-Hui, the gunman responsible for the fatal shootings in Norris Hall," police superintendent Steve Flaherty told a news conference.

Package sent 'between killings'

NBC said on its website that it believed the material had been sent after a first shooting incident on Monday at the university in which a male and female student were killed, but before the mass shooting in a second school building.

"Sometime after he killed two people in a dormitory but before he slaughtered 30 more in a classroom building Monday morning, Cho Seung-Hui sent NBC News a rambling communication and videos about his grievances," the network said.

"The correspondence included multiple photographs, video and writings. Upon receipt of this correspondence, NBC News immediately notified authorities."

Network officials "would not immediately disclose its contents pending the (FBI's) review beyond characterising the material as 'disturbing.'"

Police 'quizzed gunman'

Meanwhile Police say they met with Cho after claims of stalking by two female students, but no charges were filed.

Virginia Tech police chief Wendell Flinchum said the two women who reported Cho to the police were not victims of Monday's massacre, during which the 23-year-old gunned down at least 30 students and teachers with two pistols.

Ballistics tests have found one of the handguns was used to shoot dead two other students the same morning in another campus building but police declined again to confirm that Cho was responsible for those deaths.

Cho, who has been described as a sullen and troubled loner by students and teachers, committed suicide following the rampage by shooting himself in the head.

Cho 'annoying'

Chief Flinchum said campus police spoke to Cho in November and December 2005 after two female students complained about the behavior of the English major from Centreville, Virginia.

"In November of 2005, Cho had made contact through phone calls and in person with a female student," he said. "The student notified the Virginia Tech police department and officers responded.

"The student declined to press charges and referred to the contact with her as annoying," the police chief said. "The investigating officer referred Cho to the university disciplinary system."

Flinchum said the second incident occurred in December 2005.

"Cho instant-messaged a second female student," he said. "Again, no threat was made against that student. However, she made a complaint to the Virginia Tech police department and asked that Cho have no further contact with her.

"Officers followed up the next morning and spoke with Cho concerning this matter," he said. "Later that day, our department received a call from an acquaintance of Cho's who was concerned that Cho might be suicidal."

Flinchum said police and a counsellor met with Cho and "based on that interaction with the counsellor, a temporary detention order was obtained and Cho was taken to a mental health facility."

He did not say how long Cho stayed at the facility. Flinchum said campus police had no further contact with Cho after those 2005 incidents.

Virginia Governor Tim Kaine has ordered an independent review of how the university handled the massacre and warnings about Cho's behaviour.

"The team will be looking into the circumstances of the shooting and aspects of this troubled young man," said Mr Kaine. "Why he slipped through the net is a very valid question.

"The review will teach us what happened and what we need to know."

The shooting has renewed concern over school security and access to guns that was rekindled last year by a rash of shootings. The state of Virginia has some of the weakest gun licensing requirements in the country.


"Earlier today, NBC News in New York received correspondence that we believe to have been from Cho Seung-Hui, the gunman responsible for the fatal shootings in Norris Hall," police superintendent Steve Flaherty told a news conference.

Package sent 'between killings'

NBC said on its website that it believed the material had been sent after a first shooting incident on Monday at the university in which a male and female student were killed, but before the mass shooting in a second school building.

"Sometime after he killed two people in a dormitory but before he slaughtered 30 more in a classroom building Monday morning, Cho Seung-Hui sent NBC News a rambling communication and videos about his grievances," the network said.

"The correspondence included multiple photographs, video and writings. Upon receipt of this correspondence, NBC News immediately notified authorities."

Network officials "would not immediately disclose its contents pending the (FBI's) review beyond characterising the material as 'disturbing.'"

Police 'quizzed gunman'

Meanwhile Police say they met with Cho after claims of stalking by two female students, but no charges were filed.

Virginia Tech police chief Wendell Flinchum said the two women who reported Cho to the police were not victims of Monday's massacre, during which the 23-year-old gunned down at least 30 students and teachers with two pistols.

Ballistics tests have found one of the handguns was used to shoot dead two other students the same morning in another campus building but police declined again to confirm that Cho was responsible for those deaths.

Cho, who has been described as a sullen and troubled loner by students and teachers, committed suicide following the rampage by shooting himself in the head.

Cho 'annoying'

Chief Flinchum said campus police spoke to Cho in November and December 2005 after two female students complained about the behavior of the English major from Centreville, Virginia.

"In November of 2005, Cho had made contact through phone calls and in person with a female student," he said. "The student notified the Virginia Tech police department and officers responded.

"The student declined to press charges and referred to the contact with her as annoying," the police chief said. "The investigating officer referred Cho to the university disciplinary system."

Flinchum said the second incident occurred in December 2005.

"Cho instant-messaged a second female student," he said. "Again, no threat was made against that student. However, she made a complaint to the Virginia Tech police department and asked that Cho have no further contact with her.

"Officers followed up the next morning and spoke with Cho concerning this matter," he said. "Later that day, our department received a call from an acquaintance of Cho's who was concerned that Cho might be suicidal."

Flinchum said police and a counsellor met with Cho and "based on that interaction with the counsellor, a temporary detention order was obtained and Cho was taken to a mental health facility."

He did not say how long Cho stayed at the facility. Flinchum said campus police had no further contact with Cho after those 2005 incidents.

Virginia Governor Tim Kaine has ordered an independent review of how the university handled the massacre and warnings about Cho's behaviour.

"The team will be looking into the circumstances of the shooting and aspects of this troubled young man," said Mr Kaine. "Why he slipped through the net is a very valid question.

"The review will teach us what happened and what we need to know."

The shooting has renewed concern over school security and access to guns that was rekindled last year by a rash of shootings. The state of Virginia has some of the weakest gun licensing requirements in the country.